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Faculty practice as partnership with a community coalition

Journal of Professional Nursing

Author: Gale, B. J.
Type: Journal Article
Year: 1998

Abstract:

Faculty practice as partnership with a community coalition can be a dynamic strategy for retooling the future of nursing. The Escalante ElderCARE Coalition was formed in 1991, with the Community Health Division of the Arizona State College of Nursing taking a leadership role. Since that time, more than 50 aging network and community agencies have become involved. More than $300,000 in grant funding has been awarded for Healthy WAY services with low-income seniors as health care and program partners. The conceptual model includes health-promotion services, participation of community elders in program planning and evaluation, and education of health professionals. Participation theory is the basis for the conceptual model. A large number of undergraduate and graduate nursing students have been involved in the nontraditional delivery of services provided by the coalition. The Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the Lifestyle Directions Questionnaire are the health status outcome measures, and elder satisfaction, coalition effectiveness, and cost-savings measures are the process indicators. Elders reported healthier scores in six of the eight SF-36 dimensions, including general health, than the older U.S. general population, but they also report that their amount of physical exercise and fiber intake is less than adequate. Overall, the elders express great satisfaction with the Healthy WAY programs but do not perceive as much ownership as do the coalition's agency professionals. Coalitions are emerging as a force for change and a public health strategy, and faculty members are encouraged to take seriously the opportunities afforded by them for proactive, advanced practice roles.

Further Details

Pages: 267-71
Volume: 14
Issue: 5
Accession Number: 3.4.03
Keywords: North America, older, health improvement
Reads: 154
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