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Moving to my home: housing aspirations, transitions and outcomes of people with disability

Published

The Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute are pleased to now publish the Easy Read version of the Moving to my home: housing aspirations, transitions and outcomes of people with disability (Final Report) to their website.

This project sought to understand the barriers and success factors facing people with disability to transition into housing which better suits their needs and preferences, and the outcomes associated with these moves.

Reasons for moving home were varied, but many wanted to live independently in housing that met their preferences for design and location. A key barrier they faced was lack of affordable housing. Those that had succeeded in accessing social housing had done so through special programs, or by being classified at risk of homelessness. Those achieving ownership received family financial support or utilised shared equity arrangements. Those in private rental had established relationships with landlords. Sharing was also a feature in private rental and ownership options.

Where people with disabilities had been able to move to preferred housing in a suitable location (close to family, public transport and services), they experienced positive outcomes such as feelings of independence, social participation, and improvements in physical and mental health. Those in social housing experienced more secure and affordable tenancies, while those owning their own homes (including shared equity arrangements) experienced pride and sense of security. Those in private rental, by contrast, were less secure and experienced affordability stress.

Detailed housing policies and strategies will be needed to respond to the NDIS. New supplies of affordable housing are a priority, but so also is adaptable design to enable people with disabilities to age in place. Home sharing is a useful strategy to pool support funding and would improve overall utilisation of housing stock, but provisions to enable people to choose flatmates and preserve privacy will be important.

The study highlights the benefits of choice and flexibility in funding, but also recognises that strategies will also need to integrate sufficient advocacy, information and tenancy management assistance to prepare and support people into new living arrangements. Separate program funding to build capacity in formal and informal support networks will also be required.

- See more at: https://www.ahuri.edu.au/research/final-reports/246#sthash.YM4hSzEk.dpuf


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